SOMEONE MIGHT DIE
SOMEONE MIGHT DIE
+
magicsystem:

untitled by appelsin-piken on Flickr.
+
+
otakugangsta:

Wys
+
swstark:

Photo: Reka Nyari
+
definitelydope:

(by .kopriva.)
definitelydope:

(by .kopriva.)
+
moleskinelovers:

Art by Bluewuwei
+
likeafieldmouse:

Hidden Mother
"Trying to get a baby or a fussy toddler to sit still for a photograph can feel like a herculean task. Luckily, it only takes a second to get the shot. In the nineteenth century, however, it was a different story—particularly when it came to tintype portraits, which required a long exposure. 
Photographer Laura Larson’s series, Hidden Mother, presents a survey of nineteenth-century tintype portraits in which the mother of the child was included in the photograph, but obscured. 
In some instances, the mother would hold her child, with a cloth or props hiding her from the lens, or she would be painted over by the photographer after the image had been taken. In other examples, the mother is entirely absent from the frame, save for an arm, holding the child in place. 
The results are both funny and slightly disturbing. The mother appears as an uncanny presence, Larson writes in a statement. Often, she is swathed in fabric, like a ghost.”  
likeafieldmouse:

Hidden Mother
"Trying to get a baby or a fussy toddler to sit still for a photograph can feel like a herculean task. Luckily, it only takes a second to get the shot. In the nineteenth century, however, it was a different story—particularly when it came to tintype portraits, which required a long exposure. 
Photographer Laura Larson’s series, Hidden Mother, presents a survey of nineteenth-century tintype portraits in which the mother of the child was included in the photograph, but obscured. 
In some instances, the mother would hold her child, with a cloth or props hiding her from the lens, or she would be painted over by the photographer after the image had been taken. In other examples, the mother is entirely absent from the frame, save for an arm, holding the child in place. 
The results are both funny and slightly disturbing. The mother appears as an uncanny presence, Larson writes in a statement. Often, she is swathed in fabric, like a ghost.”  
likeafieldmouse:

Hidden Mother
"Trying to get a baby or a fussy toddler to sit still for a photograph can feel like a herculean task. Luckily, it only takes a second to get the shot. In the nineteenth century, however, it was a different story—particularly when it came to tintype portraits, which required a long exposure. 
Photographer Laura Larson’s series, Hidden Mother, presents a survey of nineteenth-century tintype portraits in which the mother of the child was included in the photograph, but obscured. 
In some instances, the mother would hold her child, with a cloth or props hiding her from the lens, or she would be painted over by the photographer after the image had been taken. In other examples, the mother is entirely absent from the frame, save for an arm, holding the child in place. 
The results are both funny and slightly disturbing. The mother appears as an uncanny presence, Larson writes in a statement. Often, she is swathed in fabric, like a ghost.”  
likeafieldmouse:

Hidden Mother
"Trying to get a baby or a fussy toddler to sit still for a photograph can feel like a herculean task. Luckily, it only takes a second to get the shot. In the nineteenth century, however, it was a different story—particularly when it came to tintype portraits, which required a long exposure. 
Photographer Laura Larson’s series, Hidden Mother, presents a survey of nineteenth-century tintype portraits in which the mother of the child was included in the photograph, but obscured. 
In some instances, the mother would hold her child, with a cloth or props hiding her from the lens, or she would be painted over by the photographer after the image had been taken. In other examples, the mother is entirely absent from the frame, save for an arm, holding the child in place. 
The results are both funny and slightly disturbing. The mother appears as an uncanny presence, Larson writes in a statement. Often, she is swathed in fabric, like a ghost.”  
likeafieldmouse:

Hidden Mother
"Trying to get a baby or a fussy toddler to sit still for a photograph can feel like a herculean task. Luckily, it only takes a second to get the shot. In the nineteenth century, however, it was a different story—particularly when it came to tintype portraits, which required a long exposure. 
Photographer Laura Larson’s series, Hidden Mother, presents a survey of nineteenth-century tintype portraits in which the mother of the child was included in the photograph, but obscured. 
In some instances, the mother would hold her child, with a cloth or props hiding her from the lens, or she would be painted over by the photographer after the image had been taken. In other examples, the mother is entirely absent from the frame, save for an arm, holding the child in place. 
The results are both funny and slightly disturbing. The mother appears as an uncanny presence, Larson writes in a statement. Often, she is swathed in fabric, like a ghost.”  
likeafieldmouse:

Hidden Mother
"Trying to get a baby or a fussy toddler to sit still for a photograph can feel like a herculean task. Luckily, it only takes a second to get the shot. In the nineteenth century, however, it was a different story—particularly when it came to tintype portraits, which required a long exposure. 
Photographer Laura Larson’s series, Hidden Mother, presents a survey of nineteenth-century tintype portraits in which the mother of the child was included in the photograph, but obscured. 
In some instances, the mother would hold her child, with a cloth or props hiding her from the lens, or she would be painted over by the photographer after the image had been taken. In other examples, the mother is entirely absent from the frame, save for an arm, holding the child in place. 
The results are both funny and slightly disturbing. The mother appears as an uncanny presence, Larson writes in a statement. Often, she is swathed in fabric, like a ghost.”  
likeafieldmouse:

Hidden Mother
"Trying to get a baby or a fussy toddler to sit still for a photograph can feel like a herculean task. Luckily, it only takes a second to get the shot. In the nineteenth century, however, it was a different story—particularly when it came to tintype portraits, which required a long exposure. 
Photographer Laura Larson’s series, Hidden Mother, presents a survey of nineteenth-century tintype portraits in which the mother of the child was included in the photograph, but obscured. 
In some instances, the mother would hold her child, with a cloth or props hiding her from the lens, or she would be painted over by the photographer after the image had been taken. In other examples, the mother is entirely absent from the frame, save for an arm, holding the child in place. 
The results are both funny and slightly disturbing. The mother appears as an uncanny presence, Larson writes in a statement. Often, she is swathed in fabric, like a ghost.”  
likeafieldmouse:

Hidden Mother
"Trying to get a baby or a fussy toddler to sit still for a photograph can feel like a herculean task. Luckily, it only takes a second to get the shot. In the nineteenth century, however, it was a different story—particularly when it came to tintype portraits, which required a long exposure. 
Photographer Laura Larson’s series, Hidden Mother, presents a survey of nineteenth-century tintype portraits in which the mother of the child was included in the photograph, but obscured. 
In some instances, the mother would hold her child, with a cloth or props hiding her from the lens, or she would be painted over by the photographer after the image had been taken. In other examples, the mother is entirely absent from the frame, save for an arm, holding the child in place. 
The results are both funny and slightly disturbing. The mother appears as an uncanny presence, Larson writes in a statement. Often, she is swathed in fabric, like a ghost.”  
likeafieldmouse:

Hidden Mother
"Trying to get a baby or a fussy toddler to sit still for a photograph can feel like a herculean task. Luckily, it only takes a second to get the shot. In the nineteenth century, however, it was a different story—particularly when it came to tintype portraits, which required a long exposure. 
Photographer Laura Larson’s series, Hidden Mother, presents a survey of nineteenth-century tintype portraits in which the mother of the child was included in the photograph, but obscured. 
In some instances, the mother would hold her child, with a cloth or props hiding her from the lens, or she would be painted over by the photographer after the image had been taken. In other examples, the mother is entirely absent from the frame, save for an arm, holding the child in place. 
The results are both funny and slightly disturbing. The mother appears as an uncanny presence, Larson writes in a statement. Often, she is swathed in fabric, like a ghost.”  
likeafieldmouse:

Hidden Mother
"Trying to get a baby or a fussy toddler to sit still for a photograph can feel like a herculean task. Luckily, it only takes a second to get the shot. In the nineteenth century, however, it was a different story—particularly when it came to tintype portraits, which required a long exposure. 
Photographer Laura Larson’s series, Hidden Mother, presents a survey of nineteenth-century tintype portraits in which the mother of the child was included in the photograph, but obscured. 
In some instances, the mother would hold her child, with a cloth or props hiding her from the lens, or she would be painted over by the photographer after the image had been taken. In other examples, the mother is entirely absent from the frame, save for an arm, holding the child in place. 
The results are both funny and slightly disturbing. The mother appears as an uncanny presence, Larson writes in a statement. Often, she is swathed in fabric, like a ghost.”  
+
cross-connect:

Berlin, Germany based artist Angelika Arendt creates intricate ink drawings and psychedelic sculptures made of polyurethane clay.  Check out more of her incredible work at angelikaarendt.de
cross-connect:

Berlin, Germany based artist Angelika Arendt creates intricate ink drawings and psychedelic sculptures made of polyurethane clay.  Check out more of her incredible work at angelikaarendt.de
cross-connect:

Berlin, Germany based artist Angelika Arendt creates intricate ink drawings and psychedelic sculptures made of polyurethane clay.  Check out more of her incredible work at angelikaarendt.de
cross-connect:

Berlin, Germany based artist Angelika Arendt creates intricate ink drawings and psychedelic sculptures made of polyurethane clay.  Check out more of her incredible work at angelikaarendt.de
cross-connect:

Berlin, Germany based artist Angelika Arendt creates intricate ink drawings and psychedelic sculptures made of polyurethane clay.  Check out more of her incredible work at angelikaarendt.de
cross-connect:

Berlin, Germany based artist Angelika Arendt creates intricate ink drawings and psychedelic sculptures made of polyurethane clay.  Check out more of her incredible work at angelikaarendt.de
cross-connect:

Berlin, Germany based artist Angelika Arendt creates intricate ink drawings and psychedelic sculptures made of polyurethane clay.  Check out more of her incredible work at angelikaarendt.de
cross-connect:

Berlin, Germany based artist Angelika Arendt creates intricate ink drawings and psychedelic sculptures made of polyurethane clay.  Check out more of her incredible work at angelikaarendt.de
cross-connect:

Berlin, Germany based artist Angelika Arendt creates intricate ink drawings and psychedelic sculptures made of polyurethane clay.  Check out more of her incredible work at angelikaarendt.de
+
papermagazine:

Madonna’s First-Ever Performance at Danceteria, 1985. More photos here.
+
artruby:

José Parlá, In Medias Res, now at Bryce Wolkowitz Gallery.
artruby:

José Parlá, In Medias Res, now at Bryce Wolkowitz Gallery.
artruby:

José Parlá, In Medias Res, now at Bryce Wolkowitz Gallery.
+
theimpossiblecool:

Penn. 
photo by Hiro Wakabayashi
+
phantasmics:

(x)
+
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Katie Orlinsky
Cassandro in the Ring (The New Yorker‘s Photo Booth) Photos of Saúl Armendáriz, known to lucha libre devotees as Cassandro. Armendáriz is an exótico, an openly gay luchador who plays a drag-queen character and forgoes the customary mask in favor of a full face of makeup and coiffed hair
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Katie Orlinsky
Cassandro in the Ring (The New Yorker‘s Photo Booth) Photos of Saúl Armendáriz, known to lucha libre devotees as Cassandro. Armendáriz is an exótico, an openly gay luchador who plays a drag-queen character and forgoes the customary mask in favor of a full face of makeup and coiffed hair
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Katie Orlinsky
Cassandro in the Ring (The New Yorker‘s Photo Booth) Photos of Saúl Armendáriz, known to lucha libre devotees as Cassandro. Armendáriz is an exótico, an openly gay luchador who plays a drag-queen character and forgoes the customary mask in favor of a full face of makeup and coiffed hair
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Katie Orlinsky
Cassandro in the Ring (The New Yorker‘s Photo Booth) Photos of Saúl Armendáriz, known to lucha libre devotees as Cassandro. Armendáriz is an exótico, an openly gay luchador who plays a drag-queen character and forgoes the customary mask in favor of a full face of makeup and coiffed hair
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Katie Orlinsky
Cassandro in the Ring (The New Yorker‘s Photo Booth) Photos of Saúl Armendáriz, known to lucha libre devotees as Cassandro. Armendáriz is an exótico, an openly gay luchador who plays a drag-queen character and forgoes the customary mask in favor of a full face of makeup and coiffed hair
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Katie Orlinsky
Cassandro in the Ring (The New Yorker‘s Photo Booth) Photos of Saúl Armendáriz, known to lucha libre devotees as Cassandro. Armendáriz is an exótico, an openly gay luchador who plays a drag-queen character and forgoes the customary mask in favor of a full face of makeup and coiffed hair
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Katie Orlinsky
Cassandro in the Ring (The New Yorker‘s Photo Booth) Photos of Saúl Armendáriz, known to lucha libre devotees as Cassandro. Armendáriz is an exótico, an openly gay luchador who plays a drag-queen character and forgoes the customary mask in favor of a full face of makeup and coiffed hair
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Katie Orlinsky
Cassandro in the Ring (The New Yorker‘s Photo Booth) Photos of Saúl Armendáriz, known to lucha libre devotees as Cassandro. Armendáriz is an exótico, an openly gay luchador who plays a drag-queen character and forgoes the customary mask in favor of a full face of makeup and coiffed hair
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Katie Orlinsky
Cassandro in the Ring (The New Yorker‘s Photo Booth) Photos of Saúl Armendáriz, known to lucha libre devotees as Cassandro. Armendáriz is an exótico, an openly gay luchador who plays a drag-queen character and forgoes the customary mask in favor of a full face of makeup and coiffed hair
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Katie Orlinsky
Cassandro in the Ring (The New Yorker‘s Photo Booth) Photos of Saúl Armendáriz, known to lucha libre devotees as Cassandro. Armendáriz is an exótico, an openly gay luchador who plays a drag-queen character and forgoes the customary mask in favor of a full face of makeup and coiffed hair
+
+